New Responsibilities

EDITORIAL

NEW RESPONSIBILITIES

 

                Each year the dental profession is augmented by several hundred ambitious well trained fellow practitioners. They emerge from the drudgery of long years of study and training with an eagerness for active service to give their best to a profession that has attained an enviable position in the guardianship of the health of mankind.

The research and experiences of dentists in the past decade provide new and valuable opportunity to the present graduates for rendering real service to their patients.

They have at their command the experience and knowledge of a multitude of workers who have studied dietary corrections in relation to oral disorders and have demonstrated the effectiveness of nutritional control in these cases.

The rapid advance of dental science brought the health phase of our profession to the foreground, which calls for a still more intensive study of these conditions, thus presenting to the new graduate an obligation not hitherto encountered by beginners.

If it could be fully realized that one cannot attain the greatest degree of efficiency and usefulness in dentistry without habitually availing himself of scientific knowledge at his disposal more dentists would reach their desired position in the profession, and aid greatly in its further progress.

Before we developed beyond the stage of mere mechanics we were regarded by both the medical profession and the laity as limited in scope, but following the results of research in relation to focal infection dentistry rose to a position of importance of which we can all be justly proud. Summarizing briefly, this is due almost wholly to application of the sciences to the various branches of dentistry. Although we resented criticism it nevertheless was the force that caused us to acquire a more complete knowledge of the allied sciences of our profession which, in turn, developed research workers and students of science, honored even by the medical profession. We accepted the challenge of our critics and prepared to cope with the problems that have been encountered.

We are now approaching a new ear which entails new problems that must be solved by dentists. Although we have enlisted scientist in every profession to aid in the solution of our difficulties, step by step we have reached the threshold of success in controlling, at least to some extent, dental disease.

This is where the graduate of today can be helpful in applying the knowledge he had gained through his college training.

We welcome these new recruits, whose energies and aspirations are bending toward some great goal. Students of the past in the college of education and training, they are now students of the present in the school of experience. Being familiar with some of the present issues of the profession they are eager to make application of their accumulated knowledge and training. With their equipment and the stimulus of a great aim they will be a force in the promotion of scientific progress. “Wisdom is the precipitate of experiment, success the objective result.”