Causes of Dental Caries

A Consideration of Vitamin C as a Factor

in the Production of Dental Disease.

Some Eminent Authorities Join in a Symposium On Various Phases

of this Problem

Vitamin C has long been known to be an important element in the dietary. Its absence is the cause of the dreaded scurvy. In the following discussion the workers in this field are divided in their opinion as to its importance in the production of tooth destruction.

DO YOU CONSIDER A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMIN C A FACTOR IN DENTAL CARIES?

CHARLES F. BODECKER

New York City.

The Work of Percy Howe and Hanke seems to indicate that this is a factor. However, further investigation is necessary to show whether it is really Vitamin C or whether the mineral salts benefit dental health, which are present in large doses of orange juice.

J.D. BOYD,

College of Medicine,

University of Iowa.

All nutritive factors probably can reflect their deficiency in some way or other in the health of the tooth and its adjacent tissues.

RALPH HOWARD BRODSKY,

New York City.

A contributory factor.

RUSSELL W. BUNTING,

School of Dentistry,

University of Michigan.

No.

WAITE A. COTTON,

New York University College of Dentistry.

When a deficiency of Vitamin C with other deficiencies affect the secretions of the digestive tract, decay is allowed to be produced.

MILTON T. HANKE,

Chicago, Ill.

Yes.

HAROLD V. HANKINS,

Los Angeles, Calif.

No.

FRANCES KRASNOW,

The Murry and Leonie Guggenheim

Dental Clinic,

New York City.

An adequate balanced supply of all food is prerequisite for health. A deficiency of Vitamin C, an essential nutrient, contributes to a general deranged metabolism which, in turn, may result in dental abnormality predisposing the tooth tissue to decay.

I.NEWTON KUGELMASS,

1060 Park Avenue,

New York City.

Vitamin C maintains the integrity of vascular endothelium within the soft dental structures and the gums about them. Deficiency in Vitamin C favors caries but does not produce it.

E.V. McCOLLUM,

Johns Hopkins University,

Baltimore, Md.

Probably yes, in some cases. The studies on this point are conflicting. Hanke’s work affords positive evidence. That of the Columbia University group indicates that it is far less significant than calcium, phosphorus and Vitamin D.

ARTHUR H. MERRITT,

New York City.

A possible factor in some cases at least. “Diets, rich in Vitamin C, are conducive to an arrest of dental caries in man.” Hanke, Diet and Dental Health, p. 45. This is questioned by Blackberg: J.D. Res. Vol. 12, p. 350.

M. FRANCIS WIELAGE,

ADA M. WIELAGE,

Miami, Florida.

Yes, as it controls the vitality of the mesoderm and as such also, blood pressure oxidation and temperature.