Causes of Dental Caries, Symposium

Causes of Dental Caries

A Consideration of Vitamin D in Dental Disease.

Some Eminent Authorities Join in a Symposium On Various Phases of this Problem

Question No. 6

DO YOU CONSIDER A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMIN D A FACTOR IN DENTAL CARIES?

CHARLES F. BODECKER,

New York City.

 

Yes, particularly in the temperate zones and in smoke-screened cities. But dental caries is also highly active in the country where people should have abundant sunshine; here caries may be the result of consuming a high carbohydrate diet (pies, cakes): this forms an acid ash in the body.

 

 

J.D. BOYD,

College of Medicine,

University of Iowa.

 

All nutritive factors probably can reflect their deficiency in some way or other in the health of the tooth and its adjacent tissues.

 

 

RALPH HOWARD BRODSKY,

New York City.

 

At present the evidence seems to point to this deficiency as a most potent factor.

 

 

RUSSELL W. BUNTING,

School of Dentistry,

University of Michigan.

 

Not determined yet.

 

 

WAITE A. COTTON,

New York University,

College of Dentistry.

 

I have found good teeth with a Vitamin D deficiency, the same as decayed teeth. I have also found decayed teeth with no Vitamin D deficiency.

MILTON T. HANKE,

Chicago, Ill.

 

Yes!

 

 

HAROLD V. HAWKINS,

Los Angeles, California.

 

Yes, in northern climates.

 

 

I.NEWTON KUGELMASS,

1060 Park Avenue,

New York City.

 

Deficiency in Vitamin D is a factor in dental caries because Vitamin D is necessary in the maintenance of the calcification mechanism. Indirectly Vitamin D also affects dental caries because the facial musculatures become atonic diminishing the masticatory effect in preventing the development of caries.

 

 

E.V. McCOLLUM,

Johns Hopkins University,

Baltimore, Md.

 

Yes. It is probably of great importance.

 

 

ARTHUR H. MERRITT,

580 Fifth Avenue,

New York City.

 

Effect appears to be uncertain. See J.D. Res. Vol. 11, p. 458. (Klein); Vol. 12, p. 462. (Rosebury), and Dental Cosmos, Vol. 75, p. 711 (Mellanby). See also Dental Cosmos, Vol. 73, p. 729.

 

 

M. FRANCE WIELAGE,

ADA M. WIELAGE,

Miami, Florida.

 

Yes, but would add that Vitamin B1, B2, Vitamin A and Vitamin C are equally important as will be the other four vitamins still to be discovered.