Causes of Caries. A Symposium

Causes of Dental Caries Civilization and the Increase of Dental Caries Some Eminent Authorities Join in a Symposium on Various Phases of this Problem

Question No. 9

DO YOU CONSIDER THAT THE NUTRITIONAL CHANGES OF CIVILIZATION HAVE BEEN IMPORTANT IN THE INCREASED DEVELOPMENT OF DENTAL CARIES?

CHARLES F. BODECKER,
New York City.

Yes, in addition to refined foods, the lack of sunshine (its penetration prevented by clothing, smokescreen over cities) exercise and vigorous mastication.

J.D. BOYD,
College of Medicine,
University of Iowa.
Obviously.

RALPH HOWARD BRODSKY,
New York City.
Yes.

WAITE A. COTTON,
New York University,
College of Dentistry.

The laws of chemistry have not changed since the world began and nutrition is the application of these laws in the production and maintenance of life. If you will permit me to change the word “nutrition” to “food,” I would answer the question in the affirmative.

MILTON T. HANKE,
Chicago, III.

No! People forget that civilization brings with is medical care and a survival of infants that are not as hardy as their ancestors. Such infants might have died without the medical care.

HAROLD V. HAWKINS,
Los Angeles, California.

Yes.

FRANCES KRASNOW,
The Murry and Leonie Guggenheim
Dental Clinic,
New York City.

The introduction of purified food products is no doubt responsible for increased incidence of dental caries. While this is perhaps the most tangible factor, the marked disregard of physiological requirements generally are no less important.

I. NEWTON KUGELMASS,
1060 Park Avenue,
New York City.

Dental decay is a disease of civilization but unlike other deficiency diseases dental caries is a syndrome of many local and systemic disturbances rather than a single disease of single etiology.

E. V. McCOLLUM,
Johns Hopkins University,
Baltimore, Md.

Yes. Principally because of effects arising from imbalance as respects calcium, phosphorus, and Vitamin D.

ARTHUR H. MERRITT,
580 Fifth Avenue,
New York City.

Yes, probably a large factor. See Moodie J. A. D. A. Vol. 15, pp. 1826-1849.

M. FRANCIS WIELAGE,
ADA M. WIELAGE,
Miami, Florida.

Dental caries is as old as any civilization. Nutritional changes of our present civilization have been important to the increased development of dental caries, but a better understanding of biochemistry will be able to affect this increase.