Cinderella Censored

Cinderella Censored
Quite recently an association of chiropodists demanded that the story of Cinderella be torn from the books and discarded. Their objection was based on the assumption that the story set a bad example and encouraged foot troubles. If the demand of the foot specialists were complied with the censors would have a big job ahead of them. The story of Cinderella may be found in every country where printed texts are found. One enterprising author has gathered together 345 versions.
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Ticks Live Without Food
Three years with nothing to eat or drink does not injure the health of a dog tick. Nor does the creature object to being frozen. He can live through both ordeals with no apparent ill effects. Scientists at the Department of Agriculture have discovered these facts through experiments made for the purpose of studying possible means of controlling this insect which in the last few years has been spreading Rocky Mountain spotted fever through a number of eastern states.
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Honey Jelly
Honey is a form of sugar that does not have to be digested but is ready to be taken immediately into the blood. There are hundreds of ways of working the honey into the diet but perhaps one of the most novel is to make honey jelly. Heat a cup of honey and a quarter cup of water to boiling, stirring constantly. Add an eighth cup of liquid pectin and heat to just boiling. When it cools it will have the texture of fruit jelly.
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Have You Heard?
Winter dust-storms in Oklahoma and Kansas often cause brown snow-fall in New Hampshire and Vermont.

Taxes on eggs represent 61 per cent of the cost.

Over 4,000 termites have been counted on a single cubic foot of infested wood.

The longest pipe line in the world -1,150 miles –is in Asia Minor.

Dr. Fernando Sanford, of Palo Alto, recently announced through the Smithsonian Institution that the positions of Mercury, Venus and the earth have a marked influence on the intensity of sunspots.

Dr. E. M. Geiling of the University of Chicago is now at the whaling grounds off Queen Charlotte Island supervising the collection of pituitary glands of whales. Because in whales this gland attains 100 times the volume of the human gland it affords an excellent opportunity for study.

After a study of stoutness in women Dr. Ramsdell Gurney, of the Buffalo General hospital, has concluded that it is inherited.

According to doctors at Johns Hopkins and St. Elizabeth’s hospitals, victims of paranoia, a mental disease, live longer than sane persons.

Two Texas scientists claim to be able to forecast weather by taking measurements of the earth’s magnetic intensity –Pathfinder.